To be fed up with

  • Aserriceño/a – a person who lives in the town of Aserrí
  • Botaratas – someone who wastes money or spends carelessly
  • Candidatearse – to be a candidate for an office
  • Chanear – to shine, spruce up or clean
  • Chayotera – a person’s signature
  • Chepear –to snoop or be nosey
  • Cruzarle el caballo – to be an obstacle or to stop someone from doing something
  • Goico – short for the area of Goicoechea
  • Guindo – a ravene or gully
  • Hacerle la cruz a – to avoid something
  • Improvisados – amateur bull fighters
  • Más torcido que el rabo de chancho – to be crooked literally and figuratively
  • Motorizado/a – a person who delivers food or goods by motorcycle
  • ¡Qué jeta! – Shut up!
  • Tamalear – to eat tamales
  • Tamarindear – to drink liquor
  • Tenerle a uno hasta el copete – to bed fed up or sick of something
foto: eyleen vargas
See www.costaricabooks.com to learn how to speak Spanish like a Costa Rican and www.liveincostarica.com for  retirement tours to Costa Rica
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About Christopher Howard

Learning the idiomatic expressions of another language will be a guide to understanding the humor and character of that culture.

In case you don’t know, idiomatic expressions are common words or phrases used in place of direct speech. The individual words within the phrases don’t correlate with their meaning. Each language has idiomatic phrases peculiar to it, making translations difficult for non-native speakers. Idioms can change within a single language, across borders or regionally within one country.