Monthly Archives: February 2017

To be on its last legs

A cachete is something good or having everything
Chivearse is to get mad
Chorpa – is slang for jail in Costa Rica. El tabo is also slang for jail. La cárcel is the correct term.
Echarse un taco de ojo is to look at eye candy (women)
Espantárselais to scare the hell out of someone
Estar pa’l tigre is to be on its last legs
Ganarse la jama is to earn one’s living. Ganarse la vida is the correct expression.
Guada is short for the town of Guadalupe
Mamulón is something that is large in size
Míster means mister or señor
Mop is buddy or dude
Pacha – a small bottle of booze
Nacho is something that is fun or funny
Peludo is slang for a dog. The term Zaguate is also used for dog in Costa Rica.
Ponerse como agua para chocolate is to be boiling mad or angry
Pura posta is something that is very good
Se fue en todo is to screw up big time or fall for something. Se fue de pollo is also used here.
Toño is the nickname for Antonio
Zafarse means to flee or slip away from someone

Territorio de Zaguates

Duolingo language-learning site appears to be a great start for Spanish

Being a former Spanish language instructor at all levels and holding a Masters degree in Spanish Linguistics, I am in a position to evaluate different Spanish language programs. Duolingo is an excellent tool for those wanting to learn the Spanish language. However, it must supplemented by practice with native speakers, Spanish immersion and above all the desire and motivation to learn the language. Remember, any method is only as good as the effort you put into it. “To learn another language, is to know another world” — Cervantes.

The free, online training site is 5 years old now, and 27 languages are being offered with nearly that many in development. Not all courses are for English speakers, and the English course for foreigners is the most popular.

Of particular interest for expats in Costa Rica is the Spanish for English course, which quickly propels a learner into a basic vocabulary. No one claims that a Duolingo course can make a learner fluent, but the grammatical groundwork is comprehensive.

After 60 or so quick lessons, a learner can construct basic sentences, knows a little about telling time, as well as basic occupations and sizes: small, big, short, tall.

The program originated at Carnegie Mellon University. So, despite being free, the coursework is impressive. Each course is developed by bilingual speakers, and many are academics with vast knowledge of linguistics.

The Spanish for English speakers course has about 79,000 learners now, but many, of course, do not finish the lessons.

That is not the fault of Duolingo. The program sends out daily messages encouraging learners to sign on and complete a lesson. Its motto is that language learning requires daily practice.

The website is available on handheld devices, too. https://en.duolingo.com/

Some may want to use the oral capacities. Those with microphones on computers can use this optional feature.

Parts of this article courtesy of AM Costa Rica