The Costa Rican Boogie Man

Bailar – to deceive, trick or swindle someone
Boletear – to give a traffic ticket to someone. Ponerle un party is more common
Cologallero – a person who searches for gold or a prospector. Orero is also used.
Dar un filazo – is to stab someone. Apuñalar is the correct term.
Estar puras tejas – is to be or feel great
Ganarse los frijoles diarios – to earn a living or “bring home the bacon”
Guachos or guayabos – slang for one’s eyes in Costa Rica. Los ojos is the correct word for eyes.
Guaro vaquero – used to describe a person who cannot handle alcoholic beverages or a so called “bad drunk”
Hacerle pique a – to compete against someone or something
Hombre del saco or Coco – the Costa Rican equivalent of the “boogie man”
La peri – the peripheral highway that almost encircles all of the entire San José area.
Le zafó la tabla – is to fire someone from a job
Sanfra or San Chico – short for the country’s many towns called San Francisco
Sobre– slang for bed but literally means envelope
Topador – a persona who sells stolen merchandise or a “fence”
Tortón – a huge error or screwup
Tu jacha me suena – your face is familiar

See www.costaricabooks.com to learn how to speak Spanish like a Costa Rican and www.liveincostarica.com for  retirement tours to Costa Rica
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About Christopher Howard

Learning the idiomatic expressions of another language will be a guide to understanding the humor and character of that culture.

In case you don’t know, idiomatic expressions are common words or phrases used in place of direct speech. The individual words within the phrases don’t correlate with their meaning. Each language has idiomatic phrases peculiar to it, making translations difficult for non-native speakers. Idioms can change within a single language, across borders or regionally within one country.