To be naked

Cambiar la marcha – Literally means to change gears when driving a car but it also means to change the subject in a conversation.
Chingoleta – naked
Cholladao/a – a seamless person
Coligallero/a or torero/a – person who prospects or searches for gold
Dejar el ombligo – Literally means to leave your belly button. But here this term refers to the place where someone is born.
Estar hasta el copete – to be fed up with something
Estirar la pata – slang for to die.
Fajarse – to make a big effort
Guato, peludo or zaguate – all mean dog in Costa Rica. The correct word for dog is perro.
Pedirle la lupa a alguien – to request that someone get fired from a job.
Piña – Literally means pineapple but here it is a car’s axle, also.
Quedar como un ajo – to be clean
Sopapos – blows or hits
Tragar grueso – to be difficult
Tucas – legs
Ventanear – to window shop
Yuyo – a person who is a pest but can also denotes a germ

See www.costaricabooks.com to learn how to speak Spanish like a Costa Rican and www.liveincostarica.com for  retirement tours to Costa Rica
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About Christopher Howard

Learning the idiomatic expressions of another language will be a guide to understanding the humor and character of that culture.

In case you don’t know, idiomatic expressions are common words or phrases used in place of direct speech. The individual words within the phrases don’t correlate with their meaning. Each language has idiomatic phrases peculiar to it, making translations difficult for non-native speakers. Idioms can change within a single language, across borders or regionally within one country.